Carefully re-opening

If you’re over 50 years of age, you may be wondering about the resumption of theatre & concerts. We miss them. But we also know that there’s a pandemic on, and it’s especially hazardous for those who are older.

You may be watching the haggling between teachers & the province over the number of bodies to be in each class, dimly aware that a classroom won’t hold more than 40 people, while concert venues are much bigger, filled not with children but folks as old or older than you, sitting in close proximity.

  • Koerner Hall? Perhaps 1300 or more
  • Four Seasons Centre? Home of the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada As many as 2000 when it’s full.
  • Roy Thomson Hall, where we go to hear the Toronto Symphony and/or the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir has a capacity of 2600.

So how is it going to work? If you’re like me, you want to know that these big institutions are taking as much care as necessary. But how much is that though?

A friend shared a survey with me, designed to gather data about our comfort level.
https://www.surveymonkey.ca/r/2PN7CVF

If you’re curious, if you’re worried? Or if you aren’t worried. Please respond. Your input is needed.

Masks hanging to dry, after washing
This entry was posted in Dance, theatre & musicals, Personal ruminations & essays, Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Carefully re-opening

  1. Edward Brain says:

    It’s not just people over 50 who are wondering about this – I am wondering the same thing and I am under 50. But some delay today for better days tomorrow is probably wise.

    • mvbonbon says:

      Hi Edward,

      I thought I would respond to your comment as I am the creator of this survey and in the best position position to respond (Sorry Leslie, I don’t mean to hijack here – and please jump in).

      In my experience creating complex metric/ indicators (I’ve been creating them for the nuclear engineering industry for the last 15 years), returns the best results when data from human subjects focuses on a specific demographic.

      In my experience, human subjects over the age of 50 are more likely to participate in data collection when questions have been custom tailored to their needs – and a space for feedback provided.

      The under 50 demographic will be asked to participate in a few weeks time.

      I hope you’ll be one of the first to participate 🙂
      .

    • barczablog says:

      Edward, blame me rather than mybonbon (who shared the survey with me). I framed it as “If you’re over 50 years of age, you may be wondering about the resumption of theatre & concerts” in the interest of blogging, sharing something as though it were off the cuff & spontaneous: when in fact the survey is carefully created & scientific. The only thing spontaneous is my quick writing, which doesn’t necessarily serve the content with due care (And I would add as an aside “SO sorry MBB”).

      • Edward Brain says:

        To Leslie and mybonbon – no worries. I don’t blame anyone. I just wanted to respond that I am wondering the same thing and that I am under 50.

        No need to blame anyone or apologize.

  2. Elaine Calder says:

    As a dual citizen, over the age of 70, I can fly across North America from Vancouver to NYC on a five-hour flight if I so choose. I don’t, of course, but the airlines are keen to tell me how safe it is. Safer than two hours in a concert hall? If the performance venues had shareholders and made as much money as the airlines do they’d be strenuously arguing to re-open. But I’m not sure that would change anyone’s mind if they are concerned for their safety. So what am I saying? That it has more to do with how we feel than the “facts” that are presented to us.

    • barczablog says:

      Very true! and thanks for sharing your thoughts. I think you’re right, that especially given the isolation imposed by the pandemic, emotions are running high, and we’re not necessarily logical in our responses. It doesn’t help that in some jurisdictions, the messaging is disorganized & contradictory, a recipe for frustration, stress & fear.

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